The dwindling external policies of Hungary…

Reading through history I always find one amazingly big loophole in the political life of the Hungarian state, kingdom, republic and so one…The way it handles/handled its external relations and policies is just appalling. The examples are plentiful, but this year alone gave us some examples that were pretty much ignored or were not reacted upon by the Hungarian foreign ministry.

I remember how a couple of months ago there was a small diplomatic scandal, between Romania and Hungary, when the Hungarian presidential airplane was denied the right to land on a Romanian airstrip. If I recall well, the Hungarian president was on an unofficial visit to one of the battle sites of the Hungarian revolution of 1848-1849.

Further on, I recall how some time later there was a meeting between the two heads of state, Băsescu and Sólyom. Of course the question of the Szekler autonomy was razed as well. Now I personally just cannot comprehend how Basescu became the president of any country at all, but from a political point of view his reaction was exceptional. Basically he is the head of state of a country (in this case Romania), on an official visit to another country (Hungary) and he stands up for his country. His reply was straight forward:”Romania is a unitary, national state. Local autonomy’s are a must, but the same decentralization is needed in both Tulcea county and Harghita”. Although I have something against the notion of a “national state” and I am an advocate of autonomy for consistent regional minorities, the Romanian president’s response is straight forward. Where ever he is, he protects the interests of his country.

Later on, at the Tusvanyos summer festival, the leader of the FIDESZ (HU) party, which is going to win the upcoming elections, calls president Basescu a good friend and ally, but his words were said in a hurry, as Basescu was pretty clear that he doesn’t want to hear about the Szekler Autonomy.

Now today one of the newspaper’s headline, put it frankly, shocked me. So two words about the circumstances. In a southern Slovakian town (Komarno) the local government decided to dedicate a statue to Saint Stephen (the 20th of August is one of the national days of Hungary. Saint Stephen was the founder of the Hungarian Kingdom, in 1000 A.D.) and the president of Hungary was due to attend the unveiling. Now what happened? President Sólyom is stopped on the bridge linking Hungary and Slovakia, and he is denied entrance in Slovakia!! So the president basically turns around and goes home…Now first of all I completely dislike this Slovakian Government as the level of nationalism is sickening, and I just happen to have something with nationalists of any kind. But denying access of a country’s president on your territory is just outrageous. It is not Obama visiting North Korea. It implies two nations that are members of the European Union, who sort off have friendly relations, nations that share 1000 years of common history… So what the … just happened? And even worse, where is the Hungarian Government’s response? It is a clear sign of diplomatic hostility which demands a proper response…It is just like in the previous cases. Hungary seems to be incapable of protecting its own interests on the international forum and it is pretty worrying. A president of a country is still a president of a country and the denial of entry in another country is quite a serious diplomatic misstep that needs to be solved…

Utrecht 2009, 21st of Aug.

4 responses to “The dwindling external policies of Hungary…

  1. gasi my friend… I have a queston for you… why the f*** cant’t we just admit that we are hunagarion speaking romanions ? It is that simple we are a minority that lives in a f***** up contry. and in my opinion there is no use of making a smal Hungary in side of romania. my smal anarchist mind can’t understand wgy the fuck is there a gap betwin minorytis and majosritis in a country, cause we all shere the same god damned pice of ground, and have the same fuked up rights in this so called democracy(a nep akarata, voia poporului, the will of the people) mate this whole democraz thing is a big fucking joke, blody hell nothing ever happens as the people wants it to happen, averiting is wow those blody politicins want it to be screw it all mate… all this hungarion romanian “hate” is blody boulsheat made up by someone for the reason of “divide et impera”, it is all a bunch of crap, mate do you realy care if you are doing well in romania or hungary or anyware alse on thi blody Earth ? I of once doubt that… the truth’s that we dont realy care if we are hungarions romanions jews or gipsis, or blody hell knows what, and we dont realy care if we are living in some contry, we just want to leave as good as posible. sory if I am off tpic but I realy had to have this out of my chest. hope you don’t mind. O and sory for the spelling and the language.

    • Gondor, I think you got the wrong message…I’m criticizing the inability of one state to defend its interest when it comes to external relations…in the cases I was talking about, the Hungarian foreign ministries proper reaction completely lacked…Believe me I am an advocate of people living together…I am constantly moving around this world, broadening my horizon, learning new languages and experiencing new cultures…I lived in a multicultural dorm for 1 year and I am going to do the same thing this year…But don’t forget that these small “multicultural Nirvanas” don’t really exist on the political scene and as we do organize ourselves into states and we do have Governments, so there are rules we have to follow…In these cases there is a huge flaw in the Hungarian external policies and it should be solved…Second of all, you jumped the line and started mixing issues that don’t belong here…About the Szekler autonomy…I don’t even know if I will go back and live in Romania, and even if I would, the region you and I grew up is different then Szeklerland…We grew up in a predominantly Romanian region (mixed), you come from a mixed marriage…But I do support the autonomy of regions that have a significant minority population (see Catalunia, South Tirol) and the reality those people grew up in is different from ours…The only problem is that the UDMR/RMDSZ uses this as a hollow campaign slogan, without any thorough plan how it would function like, without qualified people…you have to admit it, that they are one of the to most isolated counties, with no major cities, roads, infrastructure…I support a well planned and managed autonomy, that would help this region get back on track

      About the question of Hungarian speaking Romanians, I don’t live in communism anymore and this is a communist slogan..It is a complex question, but history so made it that Transylvanian Hungarians did not voluntarily become part of Romania. Both nations were already formed before the 1918 union, so the reluctance of Hungarians to consider themselves Romanians is explainable…I myself am a Romanian citizen (believe me I’m treated as one in Western Europe…maybe we should think about that as well), I respect the laws of Romania, I speak the language and technically and legally I am Romanian, but my soul is not. I just don’t feel like one, because I belong to the Hungarian minority of Transylvania/ROmania, whatever. I was razed like this, I went 12 years to Hungarian schools, so yes I belong to the Hungarian minority of Romania…This is who I am, but I am not an ethnic Romanian. I am a legal one…

  2. Click my name for more comments about this issue. I am Czech.

    Gasi, I don’t know whether you exactly understand this point, but St Stephen is the founder and symbol of Greater Hungary – while Komárno is a city in Slovakia.

    Sólyom simply has no business to celebrate the Hungarian statehood on the Slovak territory, especially if he decides to pretend that Slovakia has no leaders that he should meet i.e. that a Stephen of the 11th century is more important than the current Slovak leaders.

    Moreover, August 21st is not a day when the Hungarians should be celebrating, certainly not on a Slovak territory. It is a day when they should be ashamed for their dirty history: 30,000 Hungarian troops invaded Czechoslovakia, along the same Komárno bridge as Sólyom wanted to use again.

    Well, if Stephen I was so important that they wanted his canonization day to remain shining forever, our Hungarian comrades should have avoided the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia.

    At least in Czechia and Slovakia, the 1968 invasion is a damn more important an anniversary than the canonization of a medieval uneducated Tatar-like leader sometime in 1083. Please get used to it. This is a fact on the territory of Slovakia, and if it is different in Hungary (proper), then it is only different in Hungary (proper) and you can’t generalize it behind its borders.

    Otherwise, I am offended by the comments by the Hungarian president that Slovakia should be a bi-lingual multicultural country. The results of all the history is that Slovakia is a unitary nation state. As a country, it hasn’t been co-ruled by Hungarians since 1918.

    Hungary happened to stand on the wrong side of all the big wars. In the World War I, it defended an obsolete feudal empire. In the World War II, it was nurturing its Nazi-sponsored influence on the surrounding territories. It lost both wars and it’s great that it did. Those days of a Great Hungary are over, OK?

    If Hungary is going to revive some Henlein tactics and whine in the European Union about its inability to spread all over the Central and Eastern Europe, much like Henlein used to cry in front of comrade Hitler, and if it escalates the problems and tensions, well, it will probably lose the third war, too. Please stop it before it’s too late.

    Hungarians in Slovakia enjoy decent life, otherwise they would emigrate a few miles, but their culture simply doesn’t have the same official status on the Slovak territory as the Slovak culture (and language), and no one is going to change this status quo “for free”. Such dramatic changes usually require wars.

    • First of all I’m going to say the same thing as I said to Gondor…You jumped the line as I was trying to point out a flaw in the Hungarian Government and I didn’t want to find an explanation of why the President’s access was refused…But now let me answer your issues…
      First of all the present Slovakian Government is pretty much doing everything possible to be hostile towards Hungary and the Hungarian minority of Slovakia, and today’s action was a clear sign of hostility…
      Second of all, I would doubt that if president Gasparovic would go to Bekescsaba to unveil a statute of Svatopluk, on the 15th of March, he would be denied diplomatic access into Hungary..Sorry, but Slovakian nationalism is rising again and I grew up in one of the mostnationalist cities of Romania so believe me I do know the signs of it…

      About the Slovakian “nation state” I feel really sorry, but at the time of the 1918 independence, 30 % of Slovakia was made up of Hungarians and now they are approx. 10 %.. Well it’s far fetched to say that this is or was a nation state, especially that it didn’t exist until 1918!. I’m sorry if I am hurting national egos here but I do believe in an objective history and the state of Slovakia simply did not exist until the 20th century…

      Calling Hungarian history dirty is just a sign of disgrace. Sorry but history is the way it is and Czech history has its fare share of dirty moments…Don’t think I don’t know the dirty moments of Hungarian history..Yes they existed, but then again it is a rich history with plentiful events that helped shape modern European history. Calling Saint Stephen an uneducated tatar looking bloke is once again a sign of disgrace towards a national figure of another country..

      Sorry if the dates coincided, but the Slovakian state officials knew about this visit well in advance…It was just an excuse not to allow president Solyom in the country…Sorry mate but I’m not convinced about the Slovakian arguments just as I am appalled by the lack of reaction of the Hungarian foreign ministry…

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